HOWARD W.ROBERTSON

Takemusu aiki

The varied thrush has started
singing in our yard today,
ethereal
and haunting,
some of us would
say,
the voice of the mysterious
forest on whose edge our property
is situated,
or a fuzzy and metallic
whistle,
as some others tell it less
rhapsodically;
and such ecstatic
and erratic sound upon the
February air has power to charm
the portals opening on the
Universe,
to harmonize with the
courageous creativity that
constantly renews the cosmos,
to
achieve aiki with takemusu,
to call
out across the floating bridge of
heaven and to stand where fire and
water intersect,
the fractal spot that
replicates itself on every scale from
tiny to immense,
the center in the
lower abdomen through which an
all-pervading,
star-creating Spirit
comes and goes,
as does the
penetrating song of this survivor of
the previous mass extinction over
sixty million years ago,
this
feathered dinosaur,
this little singer
in our yard as spring approaches.

Howard W. Robertson

 

Howard W. Robertson

poet3 Howard W. Robertson is a poet and fiction writer who lives in Eugene, Oregon. He has published eight books of poems: ODE TO CERTAIN INTERSTATES (Publication Studio, 2013); THE GREEN FORCE OF SPRING (Publication Studio, 2013); ODES TO THE KI OF THE UNIVERSE (Publication Studio, 2012); TWO ODES OF QUIDDITY AND NIL (Publication Studio, 2010); THE GAIAN ODES (Evening Street Press, 2009); THE BRICOLAGE OF KOTEGAESHI (The Backwaters Press, 2007); ODE TO CERTAIN INTERSTATES AND OTHER POEMS (Clear Cut Press, 2003); and TO THE FIERCE GUARD IN THE ASSYRIAN SALOON (Ahsahta Press, 1987). Poetry with Robertson acquires its archaic meaning: a made thing, ποίημα, which is to say that he defines the poem very broadly. Each of his poems is an ode, a fiction, an essay, an abstract painting, and a jazz recording. His poetry is a mimesis of the streaming of Being through Nonbeing. It flows continuously, pausing at times but rarely stopping. Line-breaks never halt the fluent forward progress and his poetry affirms with Aristotle that truth is most universally told through a blend of ficta and facta. Each poem is an essay of existential discovery, an enterprising foray into the discursive wilderness. Each portrays visually the drift and swirl of the things themselves and the interconnected chiaroscuro of shadowy everydayness and shimmering intensity. His work is based on the belief that reality never fails, nor does the phenomenal revelatory streaming of its representation in authentic poetry. His major influences are Heidegger, Whitman, Pushkin, Bashō, Cervantes, Montaigne, and Ovid.